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Aug 22, 2018

Everyone vs Every One: Meanings, differences, and how to use them in sentences

Everyone vs Every One: Meanings, differences, and how to use them in sentences
These words sound similar but differ in meaning and spelling. Everyone means "everybody" and is used to refer to all the people within a group. 
Examples
i. Everyone bought the book.
ii. Can you show everyone where you kept the phone?
iii. Make sure everyone has a copy of your latest publication.
iv. Everyone must adhere to the new rules.

Everyone takes a singular verb.
Examples
i. Everyone is inside.
ii. Everyone in the family likes you.
iii. Everyone looks disturbed. Why?

Please note: Everyone only refers to living things. We use "everything" to refer to non-living things.


On the other hand, every one is synonymous to "each" or "each one" and refers to each individual within the group, every single person or thing. That is why it is tautologous (if not ungrammatical) to say "Each and every one of you." One of the rules you must apply in order to avoid needless repetition is, "If one word swallows the meaning of other words, use that word alone." Therefore, instead of saying "Each and every one of you", you can say:
i. Each of you (e.g., I would like to thank each of you for coming).
ii. Each one of you (e.g., I would like to thank each one of you for coming).
iii. Every one of you (e.g., I would like to thank every one of you for coming).

Every one is often followed by "of".
Examples
i. I would like to thank every one of you for making it a date.
ii. I have read the minutes to every one of the employees.
iii. Every one of her ideas is worth considering.

Every one can also be used without "of".
Examples
i. She has four children. Every one occupies the most favourable place of her heart.
ii. I have no more copies in stock. I have sold every one.

Every one can be used with living and non-living things as illustrated above.

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