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Sep 13, 2017

When to use "being" and "been" in a sentence

English as a language has a thousand and one words that confuse its users in terms usage, and unarguably, "being" and "been" constitute the list. So, I will be showing you how to use these words in sentences in order to set you free from such dilemma. 

"Being" and "been" are variants of the primary auxiliary verb "be". The "be" verb has eight forms/variants: be, amisarewaswerebeing and been. While "being" is the continuous form of "be", "been" is the past participle of "be".
When to use "being" and "been" in a sentence
WHEN TO USE "BEEN" IN A SENTENCE
The auxiliary, "been" (if it must occur in a sentence) is always used after the auxiliary verbs, havehas, having and had.
Examples
  • I have been sleeping.
  • It has been one problem or the other.
  • Had it been...
  • Having been told the truth,...
It is as simple as ABC. Isn't it? Just know that "been" always comes after the primary auxiliary verbs: hashave and had in a sentence.

WHEN TO USE "BEING" IN A SENTENCE
Unlike "been", "being" follows the auxiliary verbs - amis, are, was and were.
Examples
  • I am being asked to mop the floor.
  • The house is being built on solid ground.
  • You are being considerate.
  • I was only being nice to him.
  • I knew you were just being too difficult.
As a noun, "being" means a person or living creature or thing. For example, human being, supernatural being etc. However, with ample examples, this article has discussed "being" as a verb. Hope it has been helpful?

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5 comments:

  1. Nice one..
    NKECHI

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks so much, sir Tammy

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks.........femi

    ReplyDelete
  4. Am grateful,this is one major issue.Thanks alot Sir Tammy


    ReplyDelete