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Jan 15, 2018

ENGLISH LANGUAGE: Second term's scheme of work for JSS 1 - 3

ENGLISH LANGUAGE: Second term's scheme of work for JSS 1 - 3


All junior secondary school teachers and students of English should have this for proper prior preparation.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE: Second term's scheme of work for JSS 1 - 3

SECOND TERM'S SCHEME OF WORK FOR JSS 1

WEEK 1
Resumption Test (It can also be used for revision of last term's work).

WEEK 2
i. Reading comprehension.
ii. Letter writing (formal and informal).
iii. Conjunction.
iv. Consonant cluster; e.g., respect, sprinkle, attacked, string etc.

WEEK 3
i. Reading comprehension on contemporary issues highlighting knowledge levels.
ii. Elements of composition.
iii. Reading of selected passages for highlighting prepositions.
iv. Consonant cluster; e.g., splash, spread, struggle, streams, strong, scream etc.

WEEK 4
i. Reading comprehension.
ii. Importance of composition writing: communication, information, record keeping, entertainment.
iii. Reading of selected passages for highlighting adverbs, conjunctions and prepositions.
iv. Diphthong: /ei/-- Mary, day, grey, they, pain etc.

WEEK 5
i. Reading to understand the Author's mood: Anger, happiness, doubt.
ii. Writing: Arrangement of ideas in logical sequence.
iii. Selected passages for highlighting prepositions, verbs and conjunctions.
iv. Diphthongs: /ou/ --- /әu/, e.g., so, go, comb etc.

WEEK 6
i. Reading comprehension to understand Author's mood.
ii. Writing in full the points (of an essay) in sequential order.
iii. Adjectives.
iv. Diphthongs: /ᴐi/, /әu/

WEEK 7
i. Reading comprehension.
ii. Identifying features of Adverbials from a passage in peace and dialogue.
iii. Weak forms --- often, after, listen, sister, above, away, later, alone, abound, about etc.

WEEK 8
i. Reading comprehension.
ii. Informal letter.
iii. Features of Adverbials from a passage on human rights.
iv. Listening and speaking: Main ideas from the family.

WEEK 9
i. Reading: A passage on market.
ii. Adverbial features from a passage on "Value orientation".
iii. Listening/speaking: Drug Abuse.

WEEK 10
i. Reading comprehension.
ii. Identifying features of tenses from passage on "Peace and Dialogue".
iii. Listening/speaking: Child labour and trafficking.

WEEK 11
i. Reading comprehension.
ii. Writing: Transport and travelling (road transport).
iii. Tenses (present).
iv. Listening/speaking: Global warming.

WEEK 12/13
Revision/Examination.


SECOND TERM'S SCHEME OF WORK FOR JSS 2

WEEK 1
Resumption Test.

WEEK 2
i. Reading to identify meanings of words in context.
ii. Writing: An Application for Employment.
iii. Diphthong: /ei/.
iv. Correlative conjunction.

WEEK 3
i. Reading for speed.
ii. Elements of composition.
iii. Diphthong: /ai/.
iv. Preposition with time and date; e.g., on Christmas day, In August 1981 etc.

WEEK 4
i. Reading for speed.
ii. Elements of composition --- The body.
iii. Stress pattern
iv. Two syllabic words with stress on the first syllable; e.g., lawyer, tailor, speaker, etc.
v. Active and passive verbs.

WEEK 5
i. Reading to identify the intention of the Author.
ii. Elements of composition --- The conclusion.
iii. Three syllabic words with stress on the first syllable.
iv. Adverbial phrases.

WEEK 6
i. Reading comprehension.
ii. Writing an outline.
iii. Stress pattern: Number stress.
iv. Adjectives --- Comparative forms.

WEEK 7
i. Reading for critical evaluation: Identifying facts presented by the Author.
ii. Formal letter.
iii. Diphthong: /ᴐi/ --- boy, boil, coin, etc.
iv. Active and passive voice.

WEEK 8
i. Reading comprehension.
ii. Writing: Composition on "Poverty and hunger", "Day I will never forget".
iii. Rhymes: Two words that end with the same sound.
iv. Future tense (will, shall).

WEEK 9
i. Reading to increase vocabulary.
ii. Informal letter.
iii. More on stress pattern.
iv. Adverbs, conjunctions and prepositions in selected passages.

WEEK 10
i. Reading for speed.
ii. Narrative essay.
iii. Introduction to intonation.
iv. Nouns forming regular plurals; e.g., kiss --- kisses, boy --- boys etc.

WEEK 11/12
Revision/Examination.

SECOND TERM'S SCHEME OF WORK FOR JSS 3

WEEK 1
Resumption Test.

WEEK 2
i. Intonation.
ii. Stress and Rhythm.
iii. Listening to speeches on the following: Human Right, Gender issues etc.
iv. Composition (types).
v. Adverbial: Adverbial of manner, purpose, frequency, etc.
vi. Tenses.
vii. Reading for speed and accuracy.

WEEK 3
i. Long and short vowels /i/, /i:/.
ii. Summary writing --- Identification of topic sentences.
iii. Identification of weak forms: above, alone, abound, etc.
iv. Reading for critical evaluation.

WEEK 4
i. Phrases and Question tags.
ii. Summary writing.
iii. Modifiers (Adjectives and adverbs).
iv. Reading comprehension to grasp meaning.

WEEK 5
i. Reading a descriptive composition,
ii. Narrative composition: Write a composition on "The fight I witnessed recently".
iii. Introduction to synonyms.
iv. Reading: Chanting a poem.

WEEK 6
i. Speaking skills (conversation among students).
ii. Summary writing.
iii. Modal verbs and adverbials: Using modal verbs and adverbials to express willingness and unwillingness.

WEEK 7
i. Listening/speaking: Asking and answering questions.
ii. Letter writing: Informal letter.
iii. Reading to analyse, judge and give opinion.

WEEK 8
i. Consonant sound /h/ in h-occurring and non-occurring words; e.g., home (hour), house (honour), etc.
ii. Informal letter (its features).
iii. The use of conjunctions, prepositions and interjections.
iv. Summarising in number of sentences.

WEEK 9
i. Intonation.
ii. Letter writing: Letter of Application, complaint.
iii. Reading comprehension.

WEEK 10
i. Listening/speaking: Contrasting the voiceless /θ/ and the voiced /ᵭ/
ii. Formal letter (types): Letter to business organisation, letter of application for employment etc.
iii. Modal verbs.
iv. Reading comprehension.

WEEK 11/12
Revision/Examination. 

Jan 14, 2018

Check out these seven (7) definitions of the word, "SLAY QUEEN" by Urban Dictionary

Check out these seven (7) definitions of the word, "SLAY QUEEN" by Urban Dictionary

At last, slay queens now have a place in the English dictionary. LOL! Among other online dictionaries, the Urban Dictionary, a well known online (English) dictionary, has taken a step further by adding the word, "slay queen" to its word bank hence making it the first online dictionary to define this word. This dictionary gives seven hilarious but factual definitions of the word, and most of these definitions project the word as a derogatory term. See the definitions below. 

Check out these seven (7) definitions of the word, "SLAY QUEEN" by Urban Dictionary






Are the above definitions in line with your thoughts? Tell us, using the comment box.
The NYSC 2017 Batch B, Stream 2 orientation course: All you need to know.

The NYSC 2017 Batch B, Stream 2 orientation course: All you need to know.


The NYSC 2017 Batch ‘B’ Stream II Orientation Course is scheduled to hold in Fifteen (15) NYSC Orientation Camps only, namely: Abia, Bauchi, Benue, Delta, Enugu, Sokoto, Jigawa, Kaduna, Katsina, Plateau, Lagos, Osun, Oyo, Rivers and the FCT.

The NYSC 2017 Batch B, Stream 2 orientation course: All you need to know.

 COMMENCEMENT AND REGISTRATION
The NYSC 2017 orientation course commences on Tuesday, 16th January, 2018 with the registration of prospective corps members. The Cut-off date for registration (in camp) is at 12:00am (midnight) on Wednesday, 17th January, 2018. Therefore, all prospective corps members are expected to be in their various orientation camps on/before Tuesday, 16th January, 2018.

REQUIREMENT FOR REGISTRATION
(a)    Original Call-up Letter or Call-up Letter printed on-line.

(b)    Statement of Result endorsed by authorized officer with authentic signature.

(c)    School Identity Card, including travelling Passport for Foreign-trained graduates.

(d)    Medical Doctors, Pharmacists, Physiotherapists and Optometrists are to produce evidence of Registration with their Professional Bodies.

(e)    Prospective Corps members should go to Camp with Functional Account Number and Bank Verification Number (BVN) to facilitate online payment of entitlements.

(f)     In addition, each prospective corps member MUST present Certificate of Fitness from a Government or Military Hospital showing his/her health status before he/she will be registered and admitted for the orientation course.


SWEARING-IN CEREMONY AND CLOSING
Whereas, the swearing-in ceremony will be held on Thursday, 18th  January, 2018, the orientation course ends on Monday, 5th February, 2018.

OTHER THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW
1.    All prospective corps members for the 2017 Batch ‘B’ Stream II Orientation Course are advised to proceed to their respective Camps as stated on their Call-up letters. Foreign-trained graduates are to report to the Camp with their travelling Passport for Identification as well as their Certificate/Transcript for verification.

2.    In the event of any loss of Call-up Letter, the Corps member who collected the Call-up letter from his/her Institution is advised to obtain Police Report and Sworn Court Affidavit and thereafter, report to the Institution of graduation for further necessary action. Those who initially printed their Call-up Letters on-line can re-print the Call-up Letters as many times as they want in the case of loss.

3.    Prospective Corps Members are to note that their states of deployment may differ from their orientation camp venue, hence; they must take careful note of their respective orientation camp venue before proceeding to camp.

4.   All prospective Corps members deployed to Benue and Taraba states should know that the 2017 Batch B stream 2 orientation course  scheduled to hold in Benue camp has been suspended. A new date will be communicated to them in due course.

5.   All  Prospective Corps Members posted to Cross-River, Ebonyi, Kwara and Ondo States who had earlier printed their Call-up letters are expected to re-print and ensure that their Call-up letters bear Camp addresses as follows:
  • Cross-River - NYSC Permanent Orientation Camp, Umunna Bende LGA, Abia State.
  • Ebonyi - NYSC Permanent Orientation Camp, Awgu LGA, Enugu State.
  • Kwara- NYSC Permanent Orientation Camp Iseyin, Oyo State.
  • Ondo- NYSC Permanent Orientation Camp Ede, Osun State.
I wish you the safest trip ever and a fun-filled camping experience!

YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO READ: 

Jan 10, 2018

"A mother beat up her daughter because she was drunk." Who was drunk? FIND OUT!

"A mother beat up her daughter because she was drunk." Who was drunk? FIND OUT!

This question has been parading itself on Facebook for while now like the madman in Achebe's The Madman, looking for whom would do justice to it. Here is what I've got to say.
"A mother beats up her daughter because she was drunk."Who was drunk? FIND OUT!

The statement, "A mother beat up her daughter because she was drunk" is a clear case of ambiguity. In English, ambiguity is a situation where a sentence can be interpreted in more than one way. Ambiguous expressions, either caused by a phrase or a word/lexical item, are always difficult to be given precise meanings.

There are two types of ambiguity:
1. Lexical ambiguity.
2. Structural ambiguity.

In lexical ambiguity, a word, usually a polysemous word, will make a sentence to have more than one meaning. For example, the word, "grace" in the sentence, "Everyone needs grace to make it in life". This sentence is ambiguous, (that is, it can be interpreted in more than one way) because of the presence of the polysemous word, "grace". Is it that everyone needs grace (as a person) to make it in life, or we need the grace (of God) to make it in life? These are two possible questions that will marry the mind of a reader who comes across such sentence, and this will inarguably leave a reader in a state of confusion while trying to ascertain the intended meaning of a writer.

Structural ambiguity occurs when a phrase makes a sentence to have more than one possible meaning. For example, the phrase, "the shooting of the robbers", in the sentence, "The shooting of the robbers came as a shock", makes the sentence ambiguous. Is it that the shooting (operation) which was done by the robbers came as a shock, or the act of shooting the robbers came as a shock? These are two possible ways one can interpret the sentence.


Having said that, let's analyse our sentence of study:

"A Mother beat up her daughter because she was drunk."

The question is, "who was drunk?". The truth of the matter is that no one can precisely state or tell who was drunk between them because the sentence is assigned with more than one interpretation. The ambiguity of this sentence is caused by the lexical item, she, which is a pronoun. The speaker or writer (of the sentence) assigned two antecedents, "a mother" and "her daughter", to the pronoun, "she", without clearly stating which of the antecedents the pronoun is referring to, thereby making it difficult for the listener or reader to give a precise interpretation to the sentence. So, while some would say that it was the mother who was drunk, others would argue that it was the daughter who was drunk. We don't need to blame them for the different interpretations because the sentence does not carry a precise meaning.

However, only the speaker or writer of such sentence can state/give its actual meaning although that doesn't disambiguate the sentence. But what happens in a case like this where the speaker is unknown or can't be found to give the actual interpretation of the sentence? In a case like this, one will only resort to disambiguating the sentence in order to get a precise meaning. To disambiguate means to give a precise or one interpretation to a sentence or construction which can be interpreted in more than one way. The question now is, "how can one disambiguate or give a precise interpretation to our sentence of study?"

HOW TO DISAMBIGUATE THE SENTENCE, "A MOTHER BEAT UP HER DAUGHTER BECAUSE SHE WAS DRUNK."

We can disambiguate the sentence by either of the following ways:

1. Inserting a more definite noun phrase "the daughter" and deleting the pronoun "she". So, the sentence should read:

"A mother beat up her daughter because the daughter was drunk."

2. By inserting the appositive phrase "the mother" after "she". So, the sentence should read:

"A mother beat up her daughter because she, the mother, was drunk".

3. Inserting the adjectives (that are nominalised),"former" and "latter", to refer to "mother" and "daughter" respectively:

"A mother beat up her daughter because the former was drunk." (In this case, the mother is the one who was drunk)

or

"A mother beat up her daughter because the latter was drunk. (In this case, it is her daughter who was drunk).

In sum, ambiguous sentences make it difficult for a reader or listener to understand a speaker's intent. Therefore, for easy comprehension of a statement, a speaker should avoid ambiguous sentences. 

Jan 4, 2018

ENGLISH LANGUAGE: Second term's scheme of work for SSS 1 - 3

ENGLISH LANGUAGE: Second term's scheme of work for SSS 1 - 3

Below is second term's scheme of work for English language (SSS 1 - 3). High/secondary school students and teachers of English language should use it to prepare ahead of time.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE: Second term's scheme of work for SSS 1 - 3
SECOND TERM'S SCHEME OF WORK FOR SSS 1

WEEK 1
i. Words of three syllables with stress on the second syllable.
ii. Phases: Meaning, types and examples.
iii. Reading comprehension.

WEEK 2
i. Words of three syllables with stress on the first syllable.
ii. Vocabulary Development: Words associated with Islamic religion.
iii. Introduction to phrasal verbs.
iv. Creative writing.

WEEK 3
i. Listening to grasping main points in a poem.
ii. Writing of report.

WEEK 4
i. Four syllabic words with stress on the first syllable.
ii. Adjunct of place and time.
iii. More on informal letter.

WEEK 5
i. Listening to grasp main points in expository essay.
ii. Words associated with medicine.
iii. More on phrasal verbs.

WEEK 6
i. Stress timing.
ii. Adjunct of manner and reason.
iii. Synonyms.

WEEK 7
i. Reading comprehension.
ii. Antonyms.

WEEK 8
i. Listening to grasp ideas in a debate.
ii. Reading comprehension.
iii. Adverbial clause.
iv. Article writing.

WEEK 9
i. Dialogue.
ii. Concord.
iii. More on formal letter.
iv. Words associated with advertising.

WEEK 10
i. Speaking to persuade.
ii. Reading comprehension.
iii. Determiners/Articles.
iv. Vocabulary development.

WEEK 11/12
Revision/Examination.

SECOND TERM'S SCHEME OF WORK FOR SSS 2

WEEK 1
i. Reading comprehension
ii. Prefixes.
iii. Words associated with environment.

WEEK 2
i. Listening to poetry for comprehension.
ii. Words associated with building.
iii. Preservative prefixes.
iv. Free writing: short stories, poems and short plays (the teacher, after teaching the students how to write short stories, poems and plays, should allow them write theirs in order to ascertain whether they understood the lesson).

WEEK 3
i. Listening comprehension to summarize (the student should read a comprehension passage and summarize afterwards).
ii. Figures of speech.
iii. Reading comprehension.
iv. More on speech writing.

WEEK 4 AND WEEK 5
i. Oral presentation: Argumentative essay/debate on the following topics:
  • Capitalism is better than communism.
  • We need health education and inspectors, not doctors.
  • University education should be compulsory.
ii. Suffixes.
iii. Words associated with law and order.
iv. Argumentative essay:
  • Military rule is better than civilian rule.
  • Should female circumcision be abolished?
v. Reading to pick out topic sentences in paragraphs.

WEEK 6
i. Words of five syllables with stress on the first syllable.
ii. Words of five syllables with stress on the second syllable.
iii. Words of five syllables with stress on the third syllable.
iv. Words of five syllable with stress on the fourth syllable.
v. Adjectives: Meaning, types and order (of adjectives).
vi. Words associated with Government.


WEEK 7
i. Six-syllabic words with stress on the fifth syllable.
ii. Adverbs (comparison) and functions; e.g., much, more & most.
iii. Summary writing (reading to summarize a given passage in number of sentences).
iv. Semi-formal letter: Meaning, features, format and written examples.

WEEK 8
i. Intonation pattern
ii. Words associated with Travelling.
iii. Reading to paraphrase a poem (e.g. dirge, epic, lyric etc.)
iv. Summary writing.

WEEK 9
i. Rising tone.
ii. Sequence of tenses.
iii. Informal letter.
iv. Reading comprehension.

WEEK 10
i. Phrasal verbs with more than one particles.
ii. Words associated with sports.

WEEK 11
Revision.

WEEK 12
Examination.

SECOND TERM'S SCHEME OF WORK FOR SSS 3

WEEK 1
Revision of WAEC, NECO, SSCE general instructions and requirements.

WEEK 2
i. Vowels and consonants in minimal pairs.
ii. Vocabulary Development: Words associated with law and order.
iii. Comprehension/Summary.
iv. Argumentative essay.
v. Revising pronouns and their uses.

WEEK 3
Four consonant words occurring at the final position.

WEEK 4
Report writing.

WEEK 5
i. Speech writing.
ii. Register of ICT.
iii. Differentiating between phrases and clauses.

WEEK 6
Revision.

People ask questions for clarification. Therefore, you shouldn't hesitate to ask questions where and when necessary as regards this topic. The comment box is for your use!