December 13, 2019

Airtel's My Offer: Get 6GB for N1500, 9GB for N2000 and 16GB for N3000

Airtel's My Offer: Get 6GB for N1500, 9GB for N2000 and 16GB for N3000

Airtel's My Offer: Get 6GB for N1500, 9GB for N2000 and 16GB for N3000
The festive season is already here and I'm sure you'll be using more data than usual. The truth is, the normal data won't be enough for you this season; that's why you need to step up. 


On Airtel you can actually get 16GB for N3000 and 9GB for N2000 as well; it all depends on what you're going to do. If you have a strong Airtel network in your location, you can either give it a shot or simply opt for the Glo Yakata Data offer.

This data offer from Airtel will work on all eligible smart devices, and it doesn't zap too much. Just make sure that you turn off applications that in the background consume more of your data.

ALSO READ: How to Borrow Data from MTN, Airtel, Glo and 9mobile

To enjoy this offer, dial *141# and choose my offer. And what you see in the picture below will appear on your screen.
Airtel's My Offer: Get 6GB for N1500, 9GB for N2000 and 16GB for N3000
If your offer is different from mine, kindly send GET to 141. You should get a message like the one below, and your offer will look like the one above afterwards.
Airtel's My Offer: Get 6GB for N1500, 9GB for N2000 and 16GB for N3000
BUHARI'S VISA-FREE POLICY: All You Need to Know

BUHARI'S VISA-FREE POLICY: All You Need to Know

Major-Genral Buhari went to Egypt and told them that as from January 2020 there would no longer be a visa requirement for Africans to come to Nigeria. 
BUHARI'S VISA-FREE POLICY: All You Need to Know
The Fulanis of north and west Africa, rejected and unwanted elsewhere, have finally been given what they wanted all along: a homeland of their own. They will flood Nigeria in their millions and within 5 years our demographics will change forever.

Simply put, a visa-free policy for Africans to come into Nigeria is a shameless and subtle attempt to alter the racial and religious demographics of our country and open our front door for mass Fulani, Berber, Taureg and Arab migration into our shores. 

By the time they come here from all over north and west Africa and settle down, we the indigenous people of Nigeria will be a tiny minority. The next thing they will do is to implement RUGA to the letter and take our land and insist on sharia law being implemented all over the country.


It is a dangerous, self-serving and self-seeking policy which will ultimately result in great conflict, carnage, racial and religious strife and total catastrophy. In an attempt to implement an ancient agenda of Fulani hegemony and turn us into a conquered and enslaved people Buhari, his born to rule co-travellers and their vast legion of slavish sympathisers and supporters are likely to set Nigeria on fire. 

You will not believe me now just as you did not believe me when I warned about the true nature of Buhari in 2015 and the grave consequences of electing him as President. 

Yet my words have proved to be prophetic and just as I have been vindicated on Buhari I shall be vindicated on this matter of the grave and dangerous consequences of visa-free mass migration by vagrant, stateless and nomadic Africans into our shores.

With this irresponsible, unpatriotic, dangerous and self-serving policy, I repeat, we are playing with fire and sitting on a keg of gunpowder which will eventually explode. It will be the final nail in the coffin of a united Nigeria. May God deliver us from the coming evil.

© Femi Fani-Kayode

December 08, 2019

How To Use IN, AT and ON in Reference to Time, Days, Cities Towns

How To Use IN, AT and ON in Reference to Time, Days, Cities Towns

Often we find problems with the use of the prepositions “in”, “at” and “on” in reference to time, days, cities, towns, etc. The following is a guide.

1. Use "in" for countries e.g. In Ghana, In Spain, etc.

2. Use "in" for capital cities/regional capitals, e.g. In Accra, In Kumasi, In Madrid, In London, etc.

3. Use "at" for towns/suburbs, e.g. At Spintex, At Kasoa, etc.

4. Use "at" to express time e.g. at 5.30pm, etc.

5. Use "in" for continents, e.g. in Africa, in Europe, etc. 


6. Use "in" to introduce months, e.g. in March, in April.

7. Use "in" to introduce years, e.g. in 2016, in 1998.

8. Use "on" to introduce days, e.g. on Tuesday, on Friday.

9. Use "in" to describe a time period in the day, e.g. "in" the morning, "in" the afternoon, "in" the evening, "in" the night. (NOTE: However, we can use "at" for dawn and night. For example, “at dawn”, “at night”.

© Eric Nuamah Korankye
The Difference between a Translator and an Interpreter

The Difference between a Translator and an Interpreter

These two professionals are closely related in terms of what they do; it is therefore not surprising that they are often used interchangeably. But, are they the same? 


An "interpreter" is a person whose job is to change what someone is saying into the words of another language.

A "translator" is a person whose job is changing words, especially written words, into a different language.


The difference between an "interpreter" and a "translator" lies in the use of medium: interpreters translate spoken language orally, while translators translate the written word.

Example 
1. Mr Peter M. Abraham serves as an interpreter in the church, a very good one at that. 

2. Mildred works as a translator and editor for the news agency. 

© Eric Nuamah Korankye

December 01, 2019

The Difference between IN and INTO

The Difference between IN and INTO

The Difference between IN and INTO

Sometimes, these two prepositions cause us some amount of confusion: the same way we sometimes struggle to distinguish between identical twins.

When you want to express motion/movement toward something, use “into” instead of “in.” 


However, if you want to indicate a location, use “in.” There may be exceptions to this “rule,” but it works most of the time.
Example
1. Frank walked into the room. (movement)

2. The book is in the office. (location)

© Eric Nuamah Korankye
The Difference between "Location" and "Venue"

The Difference between "Location" and "Venue"

The Difference between "Location" and "Venue"

These words are synonymous in many contexts, but they are not always interchangeable.

location is a particular place or position but a venue is the place where a given event is to happen.

Arguably, without the occurrence of events, all places are just locations. Similarly, it is the happenings of events that make locations to be called venues. Do these make sense?
Example
1. We have found the location of the church.

2. The venue for the match is the Baba Yara Sports Stadium in Kumasi.

© Eric Nuamah Korankye